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Falklands BBC 2

Sohofox

Roofer
My son-in-law served in the Falklands. The producer of this programme talked to him about being one of the "talking heads" relaying their memories in the film.
But in the end they decided to go with soldiers from the same unit. He knew a couple of them.
From talking to him this morning reckon it was even more harrowing if you were part of it.
 

LGFOX

Roofer
Thanks for highlighting this Micky. I visited the Falklands twice in 1985 when BA did a series of charters for the RAF. We were very well looked after by both the RAF and the Army, each one taking us out for the day. We flew on a Hercules around the island doing mail drops and then the Army took us up Mt Tumbledown where abandoned Argentinian military mobile hospitals were still all over the mountain. The marine who escorted us explained the ferocious battles that had occurred including crawling at night across a mine covered field being snipered at from above where the Argentinian elite troops were. Absolutely terrifying.
I asked him how he knew so much about this particular battle.
‘Oh simple. I was here’.
I felt my whole body shake. God they were all brave boys.

I’ll watch this on catch up.
 

mickyhoss

I sacked Glover
My son-in-law served in the Falklands. The producer of this programme talked to him about being one of the "talking heads" relaying their memories in the film.
But in the end they decided to go with soldiers from the same unit. He knew a couple of them.
From talking to him this morning reckon it was even more harrowing if you were part of it.
My mate Jonny Knights was on HMS Antelope which was hit in San Carlos water
 

Sohofox

Roofer
The Son-in-Law was in 244 Signals (AS) attached to 5 Infantry Brigade.
His ship was MV St Edmund and then HMS Fearless.
 

Brauny

Golden balls
Watched a very interesting program a few weeks ago about the conflict.
There was no glorification about it, and the armed forces were all extremely humble chaps.
Many have suffered PTSD since then.
In one part there was a black soldier (para) who just missed some sniper fire in one of the final battles, but his mate next to him went down.
The soldier was instantly killed, and as a mark of respect the black guy removed the soldiers headgear. He said he wished he had never done it, because it left him with an image that haunts him to this day. 40 years on, the emotion on his face was still as raw as probably the day it happened.
What struck me was how many of the British armed forces had a big respect for their opposite numbers. Also how an Argentine who had been wounded, spoke about how they had been lead to believe the British would kill them if they got captured, but once a soldier was injured, the Army medics treated them with the same care and respect that they did for our own.
In the summer of 82 I was having a family holiday in Bournemouth. The Canberra could be seen returning up the Solent, to a hereos welcome. I also found that rather moving, as one soldier explained how surreal it all was. He said that they had spent weeks in a war zone, with all the horrors and tensions that went with it, and then suddenly they were returning to people eating their ice creams and enjoying their summer breaks as if nothing had ever happened.

A short conflict, but with lifelong memories of both good and bad things for those brave chaps who served in it.
 

LGFOX

Roofer
Just watched the programme. Wow. A very interesting and engaging scenario of what went on. Loved it even though I felt very emotional watching it
 

What?

Roofer
My brother in law was there and said the conscripts were totally out of their depth under trained and terrified when they were captured they were amazed at how well they were treated
 

ClaphamFox

Roofer
Watched a very interesting program a few weeks ago about the conflict.
There was no glorification about it, and the armed forces were all extremely humble chaps.
Many have suffered PTSD since then.
In one part there was a black soldier (para) who just missed some sniper fire in one of the final battles, but his mate next to him went down.
The soldier was instantly killed, and as a mark of respect the black guy removed the soldiers headgear. He said he wished he had never done it, because it left him with an image that haunts him to this day. 40 years on, the emotion on his face was still as raw as probably the day it happened.
What struck me was how many of the British armed forces had a big respect for their opposite numbers. Also how an Argentine who had been wounded, spoke about how they had been lead to believe the British would kill them if they got captured, but once a soldier was injured, the Army medics treated them with the same care and respect that they did for our own.
In the summer of 82 I was having a family holiday in Bournemouth. The Canberra could be seen returning up the Solent, to a hereos welcome. I also found that rather moving, as one soldier explained how surreal it all was. He said that they had spent weeks in a war zone, with all the horrors and tensions that went with it, and then suddenly they were returning to people eating their ice creams and enjoying their summer breaks as if nothing had ever happened.

A short conflict, but with lifelong memories of both good and bad things for those brave chaps who served in it.
What programme was this? Sounds interesting...
 

ClaphamFox

Roofer
Thanks gents. I'd seen the 30min Falklands anniversary programme but somehhow missed the Frontline Story one. I'll give that a watch tonight...
 

hackneyfox

Roofer
'Spud' describing how someone was under a poncho and he couldn't use his bayonet so just head butted him until he stopped moving.

Difficult viewing.
 
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